Home
About us
e-mail
FAQ
Centrel Bank Currency Rate
13.12.2018
1 USD   22,268 CZK
1 EUR   25,855 CZK
Spas >> FRANTISKOVY LAZNE >> Description

The decision to found “Ves Císaře Františka” (Emperor František’s Village) in 1793 started a brand new area in the development of the whole West Bohemia region. The high reputation of Františkovy Lázně, as the health resort amidst greenery with miraculously curative effects of the local natural springs, was quick to cross European borders and reached across the ocean. The development of the present-day only reinforces its glory.

The present day ”Františkův pramen” (František’s Spring), known in the Middle Ages as the Cheb Waters, Municipal or Fen Bog acidulous waters, has been bringing relief to the sick of the local area since at least the 15th century, as documented by one old preserved document. Another mention from 1617 shows that the reputation of the local mineral water reached further afield, as Empress Anne had the mineral water delivered to Prague in that period.

The name of Doctor Bernard Adler is closely connected with the foundation of the town and consequently with the notorious rebellion of the women of Cheb. The doctor was well aware of the healing power of the acidulous waters and therefore he ordered the spring to be cleaned. To protect it he had a simple wooden pavilion built over it leading the water out, via piping, into a tank. But the women of Cheb took this as an attack on their right to draw these waters straight from the spring and on 18 April 1791 they flattened the pavilion to the ground.
The rebellion impelled Dr Adler to seek the help of Emperor Leopold II in Prague who granted the doctor’s request for the restoration of the pavilion. A committee was set up to solve the issue of the hygiene of the spring and the drawing of the waters, and it also came up with the proposal to establish a spa town here.

The first plan for the new spa town was created by the clergyman Tobiáš Gruber, who was a doctor in Bílina. Emperor František I. approved the foundation of the spa down in a decree of 27 April 1793 and “Ves Císaře Františka” or “Kaiser Franzensdorf” (Emperor František’s Village), known since 1807 as “Lázně Františka Josefa”, or “Kaiser Franzensbad” (František Josef’s Spa) came into existence. In the same year the pavilion for František’s Spring and a Community Centre were constructed and by the end of 1749 ten more buildings came into being, mostly around the future Národní třída street, including the highly comfortable, present day hotel Tří lilie (originally the “Loimann Badehaus”).

The first plan for the new spa town was created by the clergyman Tobiáš Gruber, who was a doctor in Bílina. Emperor František I. approved the foundation of the spa down in a decree of 27 April 1793 and “Ves Císaře Františka” or “Kaiser Franzensdorf” (Emperor František’s Village), known since 1807 as “Lázně Františka Josefa”, or “Kaiser Franzensbad” (František Josef’s Spa) came into existence. In the same year the pavilion for František’s Spring and a Community Centre were constructed and by the end of 1749 ten more buildings came into being, mostly around the future Národní třída street, including the highly comfortable, present day hotel Tří lilie (originally the “Loimann Badehaus”).

In 1820 the Church of the Elevation of the Holy Cross was consecrated, replacing the modest chapel dating from 1784 and becoming one of the prominent dominant features of the town. At that time the local mud from the local bogs had been used for medicinal purposes, and thousands of guests from all over Europe came here for treatments, including Johann W. Goethe. The surroundings of the spa town also changed. The original horseriding alleys, which used to hem in the main street, turned into avenues, French parks turned into English parks, and the town acquired its distinctive mantle of green. It was mainly the gardener Martin Soukup, and later his son, who deserve credit for the leafy avenues and the green parks.

The dramatic building boom of Františkovy Lázně continued till about 1890 when it acquired its present look. In 1832 the “Františkův pramen” pavilion was built with its neo-classicist dome and in 1841 Christov Loimann initiated the foundation of Bath I, the present day Luisa Bath. In 1844 the construction of the Colonnade of the Salt and Meadow Spring started, and in 1864 the Cartellieri Bath was opened (Bath III) and in 1880 the construction of the Imperial Bath (Bath II) was completed.

The year 1930 entered the history of the town as the date when the Glauber Springs’ Hall was opened. This is one of the latest architectonically important buildings. It could be said that the town has preserved intact its urban appearance from the days of its origin, and that over the last few years the former glory has returned. And that’s not all. At the moment, there is another well-designed ongoing development, the “Aquaforum”, a palace of water attractions owned by Lázně Františkovy Lázně plc, very sensitively placed in reference to the local surroundings.

Important milestones in the development of the town were the dates 1852, when Františkovy Lázně became independent of Cheb and was granted its own coat of arms, and then 1856, when it became a town.

In the 20th century the “renaissance” period of the town started with the Velvet Revolution in 1989 and was continued by Lázně Františkovy Lázně plc which was incorporated in 1992 and helped to bring back to life many important historical buildings.


FRANTISKOVY LAZNE
Description
Indication
Treatment sources
About treatment
SPA Hotels / Hotels
Sanatoriums and Hotels